The Irresponsible Traveller

travel and tourism worldwide

Posts Tagged ‘dahab

Sinai – Dahab’s other story…

with 4 comments

I’ve separated this post from the last one.  The story is the kind thing that doesn’t make it into travel copy – ‘Social commentary, we don’t have the word count…etc…’

As I described, for visitors Dahab is a funky beach stay – excellent dives sites (the Blue Hole and others) and, even for those packing British Pounds, it’s relatively inexpensive.  However, dig down and there’s another narrative.

Dahab is a Bedouin town.  Egyptians and Bedouins are, to quote local sources, ‘completely different.’  Egyptians don’t understand Bedouin language, and their brasher, noisier lives are at odds with local custom.  These differences have reinforced mistrust and resentment.  Ongoing violent incidents, mostly in the north of Sinai, are in part both a symptom and a cause of this mistrust.

IMG_0072.jpg

Beach cafe development in Dahab’s ‘Lighthouse’ area

Across Sinai access to tribal lands is being restricted.  The authorities have banned private 4×4 vehicles.  Check points and physical barriers have been erected to close off wadis.  For an historically nomadic people these attempts to control movement are an affront.  The police would say their actions are designed to inhibit smuggling and improve security.

In Dahab houses built on land where title is disputed have been bulldozed, sometimes before the contents have been removed.  Such properties are generally inhabited by poor people.  The Egyptian legal system, in common with others, does not favour those of limited means.  Cleared sites await redevelopment by whom?  Elsewhere, blatantly illegal beachfront development, mostly Egyptian-owned bars and cafes, is tolerated.  You have to ask why?

Foreign-owned businesses describe incidents where jealous neighbours have instigated malicious prosecutions.  Reports of systematic police harassment resulting in imprisonment and even deportation are commonplace.  Shopkeepers in Dahab are being obliged to install CCTV – for many a considerable expense, and to what end?

On a street corner I asked a young Egyptian man about the revolution. ‘The revolution is finished, over,’ he replied.  ‘What’s changed?’ I asked.

‘Nothing changed.  Nothing good for Egyptian people,’ he said.

In Dahab overweight plain clothes policemen lounge in cafes, watching people, and eating free food.  Their jackets fall open to reveal holstered weapons.  ‘It’s a police state,’ say many residents.  The 2011 revolution and the 2013 military coup have been removed from Egypt’s secondary school history curriculum.  What’s unsaid speaks volumes.

Advertisements

Written by Nick Redmayne

October 25, 2017 at 9:03 am

Posted in Travel

Tagged with , , , , ,

Sinai – the other Egypt

leave a comment »

I’m just back from another Sinai trip.  A few days in Cairo then 10 1/2-hours by bus to Dahab.

In Cairo I stayed at the same  $10 Downtown hotel I’ve briefly called home on numerous occasions since my first visit to the city in the late 1980s.  I’ve seen the place buzzing, filled by young Israelis and foreign backpackers, and empty, save for the elderly Scots lady resident who has long preferred Cairo to Edinburgh, with no fuel for hot water. This time it was different again.  International visitors were few.  The reasons for the collapse in Egypt’s tourism are well known.  However, domestic travellers appear to have taken up some of the slack.  An almost 50% devaluation of the Egyptian Pound (LE) has made foreign travel expensive for Egyptians.  As a result many are choosing to restrict their travel to Egypt.  My hotel was full.

Travelling from Cairo to Sinai involves either a 50-minute flight or a 10-hour bus ride.  The British government advises against flying to Sinai’s airport gateway, Sharm el Sheikh.  Following the bombing of a Russian MetroJet flight in 2015, killing all 224 passengers and crew, no Russian or British direct flights have operated.  Lapses in airport security were identified in the subsequent investigation.  Though no advisories are in force for Sharm el Sheikh itself, the British government advises against overland travel through the entirety of the Sinai peninsula.  For UK tour ops the glittering jewel in Egypt’s mass tourism tiara remains off limits.

I took the overnight GoBus from Cairo to Dahab – about 90km north along the coast from Sharm el Sheikh.  A ticket cost LE145 (about £6.30). The bus left at 9:00pm and arrived into Dahab the following morning at around 7:30am.  Police and military check points punctuated the route.  Standing in a line, in the middle of the night, my ‘checked bag’ was searched twice.  My passport was examined more times than I can remember.  Egyptians themselves require special permission to travel to Sinai.  Checks on their IDs and documentation were even more stringent.  That said, a raft of alternative-minded young Egyptians have adopted Dahab as a weekend escape, a kind of turn on, tune in and a bloody long bus ride to somewhere less conservative.  For tourists Dahab is a breeze.

IMG_0064.jpg

GoBus… Cairo to Dahab.  Almost there…

Dahab existed before tourism.  It has grown chaotically but organically.   It’s still small – though no one is quite sure how small, maybe fewer than 10,000 people.  It’s relatively resilient style of tourism has helped it endure the worst of the Egypt’s downturn.  Visitors today are either domestic weekenders or summer holiday families, foreign residents or independent foreign travellers.  Perhaps most surprising is the number of young Israelis now choosing to venture across the border to Dahab.  Some estimates bandied around suggested 50,000 have journeyed to Sinai this year.  This influx in the face of government travel advice at least as negative as our own.

I’ll write about my travels for the Indy, but in the meantime I thoroughly recommend Sinai.  For adventurous hikers, have a look at sinaitrail.org – something I tackled last year – and for an alternative Red Sea break (see indirect flights from the UK with Turkish Airlines or Egypt Air to Sharm – then a taxi) Dahab for tourists is engagingly earthy crunchy.

IMG_0068.jpg

Dahab – Looking up the Red Sea coast from Eel Garden

 

Written by Nick Redmayne

October 24, 2017 at 6:45 pm

Posted in Travel

Tagged with , , , , ,

%d bloggers like this: